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New cancer vaccine study has similarities to U of R research

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The vaccine is used in people who already have cancer. Immune stimulants are injected directly into a tumor to teach the immune system to destroy it. (SBG file photo)

New York (WHAM) - A small clinical trial has shown success with a cancer vaccine.

New York Mount Sinai Hospital tested the new vaccine on 11 patients who have advanced-stage lymphoma.

The vaccine is used in people who already have cancer. Immune stimulants are injected directly into a tumor to teach the immune system to destroy it. Some patients had full remission from months to years. The study was published earlier this month in Nature Medicine.

A similar trial was conducted several years ago at the University of Rochester.

"This is very different from a preventative vaccine," said Dr. Patrick Reagan, assistant professor of medicine at URMC. "This is a vaccine where we are actually trying to stimulate your immune system to attack the cancer."

Dr. Reagan said there is more work to do, but the concept is promising.

The vaccine is also being tested in the lab in liver and ovarian cancer.

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